10 Ways to Help Your Kids Sleep Better

Establish a calming bedtime routine with activities like a warm bath, relaxing music, or light stretching. Consistent, soothing actions help your child unwind and prepare for sleep.

Follow a Bedtime Routine

Stick to consistent bedtimes and wake times daily. Regular schedules help regulate the body’s internal clock and promote the natural release of melatonin in the evening.

Maintain a Regular Sleep Schedule

Dim lights in the evening and reduce screen time an hour before bed. Use warm-colored bulbs and “night settings” on devices to minimize blue light exposure.

Limit Bright Lights and Electronics

Ensure the bedroom is cool, dark, and quiet. Use earplugs and sleep masks if necessary, and consider running a fan or air conditioner to maintain a comfortable temperature.

Create a Sleep-Friendly Environment

School-age kids need 9–12 hours of sleep, while teens need 8–10 hours. Adjust bedtime routines to ensure they spend enough time in bed to meet their sleep needs.

Allow Enough Sleep Time

Expose your child to bright light soon after waking to signal the brain to reduce melatonin production. If natural sunlight is scarce, use a bright lamp to simulate daylight.

Expose to Morning Sunlight

Limit or avoid caffeine intake, especially after 3 p.m. Young children should avoid caffeine entirely, while teens should have no more than one cup of coffee per day.

Avoid Caffeine

Avoid daytime naps unless necessary for recovery from illness or injury. Napping during the day can interfere with nighttime sleep patterns and delay bedtime.

Limit Daytime Naps

Encourage at least 30–60 minutes of daily exercise to promote better sleep. Ensure physical activity occurs earlier in the day to avoid evening disruptions to sleep.

Incorporate Daily Exercise

Encourage at least 30–60 minutes of daily exercise to promote better sleep. Ensure physical activity occurs earlier in the day to avoid evening disruptions to sleep.

Get Out of Bed if Sleepless

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